Barack Obama Jokes That Navy Seals Can Be ‘Sent In’ To Remove Donald Trump From The White House On ‘Jimmy Kimmel’

Barack Obama Jokes That Navy Seals Can Be ‘Sent In’ To Remove Donald Trump From The White House On ‘Jimmy Kimmel’







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Beth Shilliday and Cassie Gill

Barack Obama proved he knows how to use a Navy Seal team when it came to taking out Osama Bin Laden. Now he’s joking that the elite soldiers might be needed to remove Donald Trump from the White House.

Despite the 2020 presidential election being called for Joe Biden on Nov. 7, Donald Trump is still refusing to concede and making false claims of voter fraud. His predecessor President Barack Obama is now joking about what it will take to get Trump to leave the White House if he refuses to go willingly come Jan. 20, 2021, which is Biden’s inauguration date. During an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live on Nov. 19, Jimmy Kimmel asked the former POTUS if there was “a place somebody could hide in the White House if they knew they were going to be removed” — and Obama’s response was hysterical. “Well, I think we can send some navy seals in to dig him out,” he replied.

Then-President Obama famously used the Navy’s Seal Team Six to carry out the raid on terrorist Osama bin Laden‘s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan on May 2, 2011, killing the 9-11 mastermind. While Trump of course isn’t a murderous foreign terrorist, some are beginning to wonder legitimately what will happen if he refuses to commit to a peaceful transition of power, as all presidents have done throughout history. So far Trump has done all he can to obstruct and delay any transition to Biden’s team, and continues to make denials that Biden won the election. Even former First Lady Michelle Obama has begged Trump to honor the respectful transition of power.

So that’s why his new book is so long! 🤣🤣🤣 @BarackObama on Kimmel tonight! pic.twitter.com/hhxTE0qBIj

— Jimmy Kimmel Live (@JimmyKimmelLive) November 19, 2020

Obama appeared on Kimmel to promote his memoir A Promised Land. Jimmy noted that the book is 701 pages long, and asked if the 58-year-old did that on purpose to that the infamously reading-averse Trump wouldn’t pick it up. “You know I don’t think it would have had to be 700 pages,” for that to happen, Obama joked in return.

This marked the first stop on our 44th president’s  video book tour for his memoir, showing us what a dignified, intelligent and humorous POTUS we had for two terms. During his interview with Kimmel, Obama cracked jokes, told stories about his eight years of life in the White House and got asked the question if he and Michelle “made love” on the night the of the successful raid that killed bin Laden. Oh yeah, Jimmy went there!

Barack Obama got in some zingers towards his presidential successor Donald Trump during an appearance on ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live.’ Photo courtesy: AP Images.

Obama’s memoir went on sale on Nov. 17, 2020 and should be heading straight to the top of the non-fiction best-sellers list for some time to come. His wife Michelle’s memoir Becoming was the top selling book of 2018 after only 15 days on the market, moving two million copies in just over two weeks following its release on Nov. 13, 2018. Within five months it had gone on to sell over 10 million copies worldwide, and became one of the best selling memoirs of all time. While that is a hard act to follow, Barack Obama is probably one of the only people alive whose memoir could overtake wife Michelle’s monster numbers. What a power couple!

 

Michelle Obama Cuddles With Husband Barack During Cute Throwback Photo From Their Wedding Night

Michelle Obama Cuddles With Husband Barack During Cute Throwback Photo From Their Wedding Night

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Cassie Gill
Evening/Weekend Editor

Michelle Obama reflected on her 22-year marriage to Barack in this throwback past, noting that relationships take ‘a lot of work’ & ‘honesty.’

Michelle Obama, 56, delighted her followers with a sweet throwback post of her and husband Barack Obama, 59, on their wedding day! The then 28 and 31-year-olds — who married on Oct. 3, 1992 — shared a candid moment in front of their delicious looking wedding cake, hilariously posing with icing on their noses. “Last week on The #MichelleObamaPodcast, Conan [O’Brien] and I reflected on our marriages. This relationship can be one of the most foundational pieces of our identities—bringing us so much joy, meaning, and support every single day,” she wrote on the Sept. 6 post.

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Last week on The #MichelleObamaPodcast, Conan and I reflected on our marriages. This relationship can be one of the most foundational pieces of our identities—bringing us so much joy, meaning, and support every single day. But one thing is for sure: It also takes a lot of work; a lot of honesty with ourselves and our partners. That’s one thing I’ve learned. I’d love to hear some of the things you’ve learned about marriage and about yourself. Let me know in the comments. ❤

A post shared by Michelle Obama (@michelleobama) on Sep 6, 2020 at 10:00am PDT

“But one thing is for sure: It also takes a lot of work; a lot of honesty with ourselves and our partners. That’s one thing I’ve learned,” she wrote, sharing advice with her followers. “I’d love to hear some of the things you’ve learned about marriage and about yourself. Let me know in the comments,” she added, including a black heart. Barack and Michelle have hardly aged a day from the 1992 photo, and looked just as in love back then as they do now!

Earlier this week, Michelle opened up about when she and Barack first met in 1989 while working at Chicago law firm Sidley & Austin. “Once [Barack and I] started talking and became friends, he was very clear — just like, ‘I want to date you. At least in my experience up until then, men would be coy. They would, you know, sort of look around the room. It was all so complicated, and it felt, a little immature,” she revealed to Conan, 57, on her podcast. At the firm, Barack was a summer employee who had finished one year of law school, and Michelle had been assigned to be his advisor.

Barack and Michelle Obama married on Oct. 3, 1992. (AP)

“What struck me about Barack was his, lack of pretense. I mean, he was somebody who knew what he wanted, and wasn’t afraid to say it,” she also said. Notably, Michelle declined Barack’s offer to take her on a date several times before finally saying yes (after quit his job). “And, I thought, ‘well, if he’s that in tune with his emotions that he can that say out loud to somebody that doesn’t know.’ He didn’t know whether I liked him back! He was like, ‘look, let me tell you, this is what I think about you: I think you’re special, I think you’re different, and I would like to take you out.’ And that was rare. And it was attractive,” she revealed. After marrying in 1992, the pair went on to welcome 22-year-old daughter Malia in 1998, and 19-year-old Sasha in 2001.

Ray J Caught Dancing To Sister Brandy’s Jams Backstage As She Faced Monica During ‘Verzuz’

Ray J Caught Dancing To Sister Brandy’s Jams Backstage As She Faced Monica During ‘Verzuz’

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Beth Shilliday
Senior Evening Writer

Nobody had more fun at Brandy’s ‘Verzuz’ battle against Monica than her brother Ray J. He was there supporting his sister and dancing his heart out to her biggest hits.

Such brotherly love! Ray J, 39, made sure he was there in person to watch big sister Brandy, 41, in her epic Verzuz face-off against former 90s rival Monica, 39. He stood offstage and showed his love by dancing along to her songs, and it was all caught on tape. It was a Norwood family love fest as Brandy onstage sang along to her 2002 hit “Full Moon,” while Ray could be seen clapping along to the beat with his hands above his head.

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#PressPlay: #RayJ was right there on the sideline getting his whole life as he supported his sister during last night’s #Verzuz battle!!

A post shared by The Shade Room (@theshaderoom) on Sep 1, 2020 at 8:27am PDT

Ray full on danced up a storm as Brandy’s personal cheerleader. At one point during the song she looked over to show her support, pointing at him with a smile, as Ray raised his hands in the air at the acknowledgement and gave a big “whoop.” Brandy looked gorgeous, wearing her hair in long braids, along with a colorful print jacket and jeans.

Brandy and brother Ray J arrive at the BET Awards in Los Angeles on June 28, 2015. Photo credit: AP.

When The Shade Room posted the video of Ray J jamming out to his sister’s iconic songs, fans were in full support of the siblings. User @styledbyjmarie commented, “If your brother don’t show out like ray j that’s not your brother,” while @iamtanishathomas cheered, “Yesss how family should support periodt.” Fan @imitationbyjerell snarked, I can’t even get my brother to cashapp me $20! Meanwhile her brother flew across the country in a pandemic to support her!!!!!”

Others viewers noticed that Brandy was getting some obvious offstage support, and the video was so sweet in letting fans know it was her brother. @tiyon.christian commented, “I was wondering who was hyping and cackling all loud on the stream. now we know,” while @palmbutter wrote, “I see why Monica was mad. Brandy had a whole cheerleading squad.”

Ray J and Brandy Norwood attend the 2010 VH1 Hip Hop Honors in New York on June 3, 2010. Photo credit: AP.

While Ray J was there in person to watch and cheer along to Brandy during her Verzuz battle, there were plenty of other big names who tuned in to watch the live stream go down. Michelle ObamaTimbaland, and Missy Elliott, were all watching. Democratic vice president nominee Kamala Harris, 55, helped kick off the show, delivering a video message of support for the singers,  while reminding viewers to vote in the Nov. 2020 election. The California senator admitted she’d be “singing and dancing” all night while watching the battle.

Melania Trump Calls President ‘Honest’ At RNC & Twitter’s Baffled: ‘Have You Met Your Husband?’

Melania Trump Calls President ‘Honest’ At RNC & Twitter’s Baffled: ‘Have You Met Your Husband?’

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Samantha Wilson
Political News Editor

First Lady Melania Trump praised her husband at the 2020 Republican National Convention for his honesty, and Twitter had some questions about it. Mainly — does she realize she’s married to Donald Trump?

Viewers at home waited with bated breath when First Lady Melania Trump began her speech at the 2020 Republican National Convention. Would this be a repeat of her 2016 address… or the one that Michelle Obama gave last week? Perhaps to the disappointment of some, it was clear that Trump didn’t crib this one. Instead, she gave a 45-minute address about the accomplishments her husband, Donald Trump, has supposedly achieved in his first term as president.

"We all know Donald Trump makes no secrets about how he feels about things," first lady Melania Trump says at #RNC2020 "Total honesty is what we deserve as citizens from our president. Whether you like it or not, you always no what he's thinking." pic.twitter.com/H66DTSHjFt

— MSNBC (@MSNBC) August 26, 2020

She was most proud of the fact that her husband was “honest,” which frankly baffled some voters, considering that The Washington Post has determined that President Trump has made at least 20,000 false or misleading claims since taking office in 2017. “We all know Donald Trump makes no secrets about how he feels about things,” FLOTUS said in her August 25 speech. “Total honesty is what we deserve as citizens from our president. Whether you like it or not, you always know what he’s thinking.”

Twitter erupted after that line. “Have you ever met your husband?” one voter tweeted. “Melania described a fantastic president… patriotic, caring, and honest. He sounds wonderful, but I have no idea who she’s talking about. Is she supporting #BidenHarris2020?” another joked. “I’m not being a smart-ass here, but I’d REALLY love to know how Melania could say some of those things with a straight face — really! …thats a talent,” another viewer tweeted.

Melania Trump speaks at the 2016 Republican National Convention (AP)

Hours before her speech, Trump trended on Twitter after White House trade adviser Peter Navarro called FLOTUS “the Jackie Kennedy of her time.” That didn’t exactly sit well with Twitter users, who drew up comparisons of their own. “Melania Trump is the Jackie Kennedy of her time. So, Stormy Daniels is Marilyn Monroe?” a Twitter user joked. Another doubled down, tweeting, “Stormy is a helluva lot more like MM than Melania is like Jackie Kennedy.”

If you haven’t registered to vote yet, there’s still time. It’s as easy as filling out the form below:

Meghan Markle Urges Fans To Vote In The Election & Warns ‘If You’re Complacent, You’re Complicit’

Meghan Markle Urges Fans To Vote In The Election & Warns ‘If You’re Complacent, You’re Complicit’

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Samantha Wilson and Marissa Charles

Meghan Markle wants YOU to register to vote! The duchess joined Michelle Obama’s When We All Vote couch party to tell her fans why it’s so important to head to the polls this November.

Meghan Markle is ready to get out the vote. The Duchess of Sussex, 39, moved back to the United States in March, and she’s spent the time leading up to the presidential election working tirelessly to get the message to her fans across: you need to vote on November 3 if you want to foster change. That’s why Meghan teamed up with Michelle Obama‘s When We All Vote organization on August 20 for a virtual voter registration party.

During the livestreamed “couch party,” titled “When All Women Vote,” Meghan, kicked off the event, which was due to feature Obama senior advisor and When We All Vote board chair Valerie Jarrett, actress Yvette Nicole Brown, Glamour EIC Samantha Barry, and DJ Diamond Kuts. The event is partly in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote. Although, as they noted, it only applied to white women. Black, Latinx, Asian, and Native American women were still barred.

“We’re obviously faced with a lot of problems in our world right now – both in the physical world and the digital world – but we can and must do everything we can to ensure that all women have their voices heard,” the duchess told the women tuning into the virtual party. “Because at this juncture, if we aren’t part of the solution we are part of the problem. If you aren’t going out there and voting then you’re complicit. If you’re complacent, you’re complicit.”

We’re obviously faced with a lot of problems in our world right now – both in the physical world and the digital world – but we can and must do everything we can to ensure that all women have their voices heard. Because at this juncture, if we aren’t part of the solution we are part of the problem. If you aren’t going out there and voting then you’re complicit. If you’re complacent, you’re complicit.”

We’re obviously faced with a lot of problems in our world right now – both in the physical world and the digital world – but we can and must do everything we can to ensure that all women have their voices heard. Because at this juncture, if we aren’t part of the solution we are part of the problem. If you aren’t going out there and voting then you’re complicit. If you’re complacent, you’re complicit.”

Meghan is a dedicated voting rights advocate. The LA native gave the commencement speech at her former high school on June 3, and took the opportunity to tell rising seniors to vote in November. “What is happening in our country and in our state and in our hometown of LA has been absolutely devastating,” she said, referring to the protests after the death of George Floyd. She urged the students to “use your voices” and be “part of the movement” that brings the country together. “You are equipped, you are ready, and we need you, and you are prepared,” she said.

Meghan Markle urged her fans to register to vote at a When We All Vote event (MEGA)

The When We All Vote event came just hours before Joe Biden accepted the Democratic nomination for president, on the last night of the Democratic National Convention. Michelle gave a stunning keynote speech on the first night, August 17, warning voters: if you think things can’t get any worse, they certainly will with another four years of the current administration.

If you haven’t registered to vote yet… what are you waiting for? Listen to Meghan; it’s as easy as filling out the form below:

2 Chainz Urges Formerly Incarcerated Americans To Vote: ‘This Election Matters’

2 Chainz Urges Formerly Incarcerated Americans To Vote: ‘This Election Matters’

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Samantha Wilson
Political News Editor

2 Chainz is doing his part to ensure that ALL Americans register to vote before the 2020 presidential election. And that includes the formerly incarcerated, who may not know that they’re eligible.

2 Chainz is here with an important message: register to vote, and then vote in the 2020 election. The rapper, 42, teamed up with Michelle Obama‘s voting organization When We All Vote for a special PSA aimed at formerly incarcerated Americans, like himself, who may not understand their rights. “For those of you who have been through those unfortunate circumstances, I would like to notify you about some of the things and give you some real clarity about voting and your rights,” he began.

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Returning citizens have been excluded from the electoral process for far too long, and many don’t know they can vote right now. We’ve teamed up with @2chainz to help give eligible returning citizens the resources they need to make their voices heard in every election. If you or someone you know is a returning citizen, check out and share the link in our bio to learn your voting rights or text 2Chainz to 56005.

A post shared by When We All Vote (@whenweallvote) on Aug 9, 2020 at 9:04am PDT

He explained that it’s necessary to look up the law for the state where you live. In Vermont, Maine, and Washington, DC, for example, inmates never lose the right to vote — even while they’re incarcerated. To find out information about your specific state, click HERE. “I really feel like this election matters more than any other election of our lifetime,” 2 Chainz says in his PSA. “I want to do my part to spread the information because many people feel like their voice doesn’t matter or their vote doesn’t count, or they don’t even have the opportunity to do so.”

“So I feel like we’re spreading this small message to reach somebody out there who doesn’t think they have the chance to take this opportunity to vote on November 3,” he continued. “Register yourself to vote. Remember that your vote does matter. We need it. We need everybody’s voice in this particular moment. I feel like collectively, if we come together during this time, we can get done what we need to get done”

2Chainz has teamed up with When We All Vote (Xavier Collin/Image Press Agency / MEGA)

The good news is, that registering to vote is as easy as filling out the form below. So what are you waiting for? Don’t let 2Chainz down!

Michelle Obama & The Roots Encourage Voters To Head To The Polls: ‘We Deserve To Have Our Voices Heard’

Michelle Obama & The Roots Encourage Voters To Head To The Polls: ‘We Deserve To Have Our Voices Heard’

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Samantha Wilson
Political News Editor

It’s never been more important to make sure our voices are heard at the polls, and Michelle Obama teamed up with The Roots on June 27 for their annual picnic to make sure voters understand!

The iconic Roots Picnic looked a little different this year. The annual event went digital in 2020, and served as a collaboration with When We All Vote, the voting rights organization headed by Michelle Obama. The former FLOTUS spoke at the star-studded musical event on June 27, telling young voters across the country that “it couldn’t be more important that everyone get their voice heard this time around. We may not all sound like SZA or Kirk Franklin, but we all deserve to have our voices heard at the polls this fall.”

I hope everyone has fun at the #RootsPicnic tonight! Tune in now to watch the show at https://t.co/vXp9MHLm8S.

And make sure your voice is heard by registering to vote. Text ROOTS to 56005 to get started with @WhenWeAllVote. pic.twitter.com/2aAKkdWncN

— Michelle Obama (@MichelleObama) June 28, 2020

She’s right! The stakes have never been higher. On November 3, 2020, voters will have to choose between electing former Vice President Joe Biden, who is currently the presumptive Democratic nominee, or ushering in President Donald Trump for a second term. HollywoodLife spoke with When We All Vote’s Communications Director, Crystal Carson and Managing Director for Culture, Communications, & Media Partnerships, Stephanie Young, ahead of the event.

Protesters have demonstrated across the United States for over a month following George Floyd‘s senseless death at the hands of the Minneapolis police. Crystal and Stephanie said that the next step in enacting lasting social change is voting in November. “[Protesting] is not all that we can do and it’s not the only thing that we can do to really see change in our country. One of the only ways to really impact change is to go to the polls,” Crystal said.

Stephanie echoed Crystal, and added that those who believe their vote doesn’t count need to change that mindset. “Every time you give that vote away, someone else is making all the choices for you, and they are electing people that best represent their values and their interests,” she said. The Roots Picnic featured sensational performances from artists like H.E.R., G Herbo, D-Nice, and The Roots, of course. Michelle was also joined by some of her When We All Vote co-chairs at the digital concert, including Kerry Washington and Tracee Ellis Ross.

Michelle Obama (REX/Shutterstock)

Both remarkable women had plenty to say at the bash, too, which aimed to text 500,000 eligible voters and encourage them to register to vote within a matter of hours. Kerry gave a passionate address from her backyard, wearing a bedazzled “VOTE” barrette in her hair. “Millions of eligible voters in our country did not vote [in 2016], so we have our work cut out for us, and we are counting on you. With all that we are facing as a nation, it is just so important that we know our rights and our options to vote this November,” the Little Fires Everywhere star said.

She recalled the horrifying images out of Wisconsin and Georgia during their primary elections, where hundreds of people stood in line, outside unable to socially distance as they waited to vote. “No American should ever have to wait in two or three hour lines, or have to choose to risk their health or the safety of their family to cast their ballot. As our country continues to grapple with the impact of COVID-19, it is now more important than ever that we, as voters, have fair and safe access to register to voting, Kerry said.

The Blackish star echoed Kerry, telling viewers that, “when we sit out we inadvertently elect people who do not respect or reflect our values. We are the change that we’ve been waiting for.” Listening? If you haven’t registered to vote yet, there’s still time to change that. Register and make a difference by filling out the form below, courtesy of our friends at Rock The Vote:

Todrick Hall – B

[Verse 1]
Yo yo
Who was doing all the cookin’
Doing all the cleanin’
Who was making sure the cookies’ always good for eatin’
Who was there putting it down every evening
Even when when you was leavin’ for no reason each time your phone was ringin’
And who was there making your friends wish that they could be you
The game was done, you is a bum
I ain’t finna feed you
Take the shit out of the Benz you ain’t got the key too
I don’t need you, kiss my ass while I pack and leave

[Pre-Chorus]
Oh honey you fucked up real big this time
Never get another bitch lookin’ this fine
Don’t let the doorknob hit you
Take your sidechick with you
Tick-tock
Kick rocks, rocks

[Chorus]
Bitch I was you B, bitch I was your Yoncé
Bitch I was you B, bitch I was your Yoncé
Bitch I was you B, bitch I was your Yoncé
Bitch I was, bitch I was, bitch I, bitch I was your Yoncé

[Verse 2]
Bitch I was a ten
Bitch you was a five (nah four)
Bitch I was a win, pussy most niggas would die for
Bitch I had you in position she couldn’t apply for
Why you have to lie for (oooh)
I’m bored
Bitch I’m louboutin, I ain’t fucking with payless no more
I’m a G6, I ain’t flying with Southwest no more
Bitch your ass is broke, I ain’t looking to impress no more
Bitch I was your marilyn you can’t blow up my dress no more

[Pre-Chorus]
Could’ve been your Madonna, now who gon’ tell yo mama
You lost a bomb ass bitch killing like Rihanna, hair like Arianna, thick like a grown Moana
Hope you happy with Melania cuz’ you lost Michelle Obama
(Hahahaha eat it)

[Chorus]
Bitch I was you B, bitch I was your Yoncé (I was your Yoncé)
Bitch I was you B, bitch I was your Yoncé (I was your Yoncé)
Bitch I was you B, bitch I was your Yoncé (Bitch, I was your Yoncé)
Bitch I was, bitch I was, bitch I, bitch I was your Yoncé

[Outro]
Oh honey you fucked up real big this time
Never get another bitch lookin’ this fine
Don’t let the doorknob hit you
Take your sidechick with you
Tick-tock
Kick rocks, rocks

When YouTubers Leave the Nest: Tracking the Success of the Internet’s Biggest Stars

For years, YouTube has been a haven for both millennial content creators and consumers. The video-sharing hub has helped to redefine what it means to be a celebrity as it’s facilitated the launch of countless digital stars’ careers; stars born not out of the Hollywood machine, but simply out of user-generated video content. There is no middleman, no gatekeeper standing guard to tell the audience who is worthy of being on their screen and who isn’t.

Rather, these stars, many of whom you may not be even be all that familiar with (but your younger siblings or nieces and nephews most certainly are), have cultivated the sort of relationships with their fans that traditional celebrities might only ever dream of. According to a 2015 Google-commissioned survey, 70 percent of teenage subscribers admitted that they relate to YouTube creators more than traditional celebs, while the six in 10 subscribers said they would follow advice on what to buy from their favorite creator over even their favorite film or TV celeb. And at a time when more and more millennials are avoiding watching TV altogether, networks and studios are hungry to poach some of that talent in hopes of poaching those eyeballs. 

But does the YouTuber influence transcend mediums? Is that intense bond between creator and consumer one that can survive the transition to traditional avenues? As more creators have found themselves unable to resist Hollywood’s siren call, we’re starting to find out.

Miranda Sings is an intentionally off-putting character, a satire of the countless YouTube wannabes, lacking in talent, but not in ego, who had infected the streaming site. She sings off-key, has her own unique way of saying just about everything, and is defiantly self-righteous. And she’s made the woman who brought her to life, comedian Colleen Ballinger, one of YouTube’s biggest success stories. Since her debut on the website in 2008, her combined Youtube channels have surpassed 2.5 billion total views, while the character has more than 6 million Instagram followers. By 2009, Ballinger had taken her show on the road, performing a one-woman Miranda Sings act in theaters across the globe. Jerry Seinfeld had tapped her for an episode of his Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee series, she appeared on The Tonight Show, she released a New York Times Best Seller. It was only a matter of time before someone offered her a TV show. Enter: Netflix.

Developed by Ballinger and her brother Chris, Haters Back Off launched on the streaming giant in 2016, making her one of the first YouTube personalities to launch a scripted series. The move to Netflix made sense, as millennials are certainly more comfortable with the streaming service (itself a traditional TV model “disrupter,” much like YouTube). “[Netflix] can also leverage the audiences of these online stars, and their marketing reach, to drive the fans to new properties (which also happen to be online, where their fans already routinely seek entertainment),” TechCrunch wrote when the show was announced. And they were right. 

Traditional critics may not have known what to make of the show, earning it only mixed reviews, but clearly Ballinger’s fans followed her. The show debuted as the second most popular digital original series for the week of October 14, 2016, earning it a second season, which dropped on Friday. 

Ballinger’s transition to a more traditional medium may seem like the beginning of a successful sea change, but you’ll not we didn’t call her the first YouTube personality to launch a scripted series. That’s because there are a few who came before. You may be surprised to know that two of TV’s currently most celebrated comedies got their humble beginnings as on the website.

Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson met as students at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in 2007, honing their skills and sharpening their relationship dynamic on the same practice improv team. “We got to play onstage for two years as friends and find our voice,” Jacobson told Paper in 2013. “A Web series is now known as a vehicle to get something bigger, but when we started, it wasn’t. We just said, ‘Let’s make something.’”

That something turned into Broad City, which the comedians debuted on YouTube in 2009. During its two-season run on the video hub, Broad City didn’t exactly spread like wildfire in the way Ballinger’s creation had, but it did manage to draw in exactly the right sort of viewer to further its success. “During the web series, we were never viral. It was always just the quality of viewers,” Glazer told Fast Company in 2014. “We just started to get a response from our community–the comedy community in New York–and that was enough to make us feel like it was something good and relatable and that we should keep making them.”

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One of those in the comedy community who caught on? Amy Poehler, who agreed to appear in the web series’ final episode as she subsequently helped the pair shop a pilot script based on the series. “We just sort of went out on a limb and told her that we were planning to pitch the show for TV, and would she ever consider being an executive producer on the project, and she said yes,” Glazer said. Broad City debuted on Comedy Central in 2014 and is currently in its fourth season on the cable network. Since the launch, the duo have become bona fide stars, landing roles in movies like Rough Night (Glazer) and The Lego Ninjago Movie (Jacobson). They even held their first-ever panel at entertainment mecca, San Diego Comic Con, in 2017.

While Glazer and Jacobson were just getting their web series off the ground in 2009, Issa Rae was an L.A. transplant living in New York City, working at the prestigious Public Theater on a fellowship. That fish-out-of-water situation is where her successful YouTube series, The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl, was born. “I was just thinking about how hard it was to meet people. And how just interacting with new people is so awkward,” she told BET in 2011. “And I couldn’t be the only one thinking these things and wouldn’t it be funny to see these interactions played out on screen.”

After sitting on the idea for two years, and returning to L.A., Rae was finally ready to launch Awkward Black Girl in 2011. “I wanted to tell this story and I thought, ‘If I don’t start it myself, I’ll never get it done,’ ” she told The Root that year. “We’re not all ugly. We’re not all desperate. We’re just normal, awkward girls trying to find ourselves.” It quickly proved to be a viral hit. A Kickstarter campaign to fund the rest of the season garnered over $56,000 from nearly 2,000 donations. It caught the eye of Pharrell Williams who signed on as an executive producer for season two, which aired on his iamOTHER channel. By 2013, she was working on a pilot script partially based on Awkward Black Girl with comedian, producer and The Daily Show correspondent Larry Wilmore.

The pilot, which was eventually named Insecure, was bought by HBO in 2015 and ordered to series for a fall 2016 launch. The critically acclaimed series, which stars Rae and Yvonne Orji, recently finished airing its second season and has already received an order for a third. “I still very much feel like I’m ‘that Internet girl,’” Rae told Rolling Stone ahead of the show’s launch. “I still feel an allegiance there, but I don’t know that I’ll ever feel like I’m a part of Hollywood. It just feels like I’m getting the chance of a lifetime to make something that’s pure and authentic to me. To have more people watch it is the coolest ever, but I don’t feel much different other than that.” With a role in the upcoming film The Hate U Give and a standout appearance in Jay-Z‘s instantly iconic, Friends-recreating music video for “Moonlight” (seriously, if you haven’t seen this video, fix your life here), something tells us she’s feeling like a part of Hollywood now.

Jeff Vespa/WireImage

Of course, there are plenty of YouTube personalities who aren’t characters ready to be spun off into their own scripted series. But that hasn’t stopped those wildly popular individuals from finding avenues into take their massive fanbases down avenues leading to traditional media. For those who’ve made their fame just by being themselves, they’ve found the Hollywood machine is ready to try almost anything with them. Take Tyler Oakley, for example.

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The internet’s unofficial best friend, Oakley began posting videos on YouTube in 2007 as a way of keeping in touch with friends and family while he was away in college. When an upload of his gained more views than he had friends, he knew he might be on to something. “The first time was when I had 100 views on a single video and I was like, ‘Uhhh… I don’t have 100 friends???’ so it definitely opened my eyes and I quickly realized that strangers could find me on the Internet,” he told Forbes of the first time he realized he’d made it as an internet celebrity. “I also remember once in college I was at a university football game, and I looked around, knowing that the packed stadium could fit 75,000 people, and I had more subscribers than that.

With videos on topics ranging from queer politics (Oakley is gay), pop culture and humor, Oakley’s managed to connect with his audience in a way that Ballinger or Rae never could with their characters. As they tuned in for each new video, it was as if he was speaking directly to them, giving them a window into his real life. Remember that stat above about millennials trusting YouTube personalities so much more than traditional celebrities? Oakley is the prime example of that. As a result, he’s parlayed that trust into a sold-out live show tour (2014’s “Tyler Oakley’s Slumber Party”), a video with then-First Lady Michelle Obama discussing education issues, the 2015 release of his first book, a collection of humorous personal essays entitled Binge, and a 2016 stint on The Amazing Race (he and BFF Korey Kuhl finished in third place).

Soon after his race around the world, he inked a development deal with Ellen DeGeneres that began with original digital content (The Tyler Oakley Show premiered on DeGeneres’ ellentube platform in 2016.) with the aim to develop traditional TV projects, as well. Those TV projects haven’t come to fruition just yet, but for Oakley, working with the comedian is a real unlocked achievement. “She’s somebody I said, ‘If I ever did TV, I wouldn’t want to do it with anyone but her,’” he told Variety in 2016. “Now, making it happen, it’s a dream come true. It’s what I wanted all along… It feels like a brand-new job.”

Following in Oakley’s footsteps are fellow personalities Hannah Hart, Cameron Dallas and Gigi Gogeous. Each rose to prominence on the video hub for very different reasons (drunken cooking, playful pranks and a very public transition, respectively), but they’ve all been given opportunities to parlay their very popular personalities to traditional media. Hart recently launched a travelogue cooking series I Hart Food on Food Network, Dallas took his entourage to Network to give fans a further glimpse into his life with reality series Chasing Cameron, and Gorgeous took a documentary, This Is Everything, to Sundance before landing a gig as one of the social media correspondents on MTV’s revived TRL. 

While some have played into the cult of personality as they transition from YouTube to the great beyond, others have used the site to bounce back from disappointing runs on reality shows meant to launch them to stardom. After stalling out in the semi-finals of American Idol season nine, Todrick Hall turned to YouTube, releasing viral video after viral video. By fall of 2013, he landed a gig writing the song and lyrics for Virgin America’s musical safety video, which he also starred in. A year later, Todrick debuted on MTV, with each episode showing Hall and his team create a new music video from start to finish. By 2016, he was a full-time judge on RuPaul’s Drag Race All-Stars 2, had self-released his third album, a visual conceptual album called Straight Outta Oz, and landed on Broadway in the lead role of Lola in Kinky Boots. Oh, and he appeared in a little music video that only broke the internet. ‘Look What You Made Me Do” by Taylor Swift ever heard of it?

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Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Like Hall, violinist Lindsey Stirling turned to YouTube to recover from a particularly painful reality TV elimination. After making the semi-finals in season five of America’s Got Talent, judges Piers Morgan and Sharon Osbourne told the musician that her unique style of performance art (which involves some impressive dancing while playing her instrument) wasn’t good enough. Within two years, she had the No. 8 top viewed YouTube video of 2012 with her song “Crystallize.” Since then, she’s toured the world, performed with Cirque du Soleil, released four albums and one autobiography and is currently competing for the mirrorball trophy in season 25 of Dancing With the Stars. So take that, Piers.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Of course, it hasn’t exactly been smooth sailing for everyone as they attempt to turn their YouTube fame into traditional success in Hollywood. PewDiePie, who currently ranks as the No. 1 most subscribed user on the website with an astonishing 57 million subscribers, has found himself in several controversies in recent years. As the Swedish comedian, whose real name is Felix Kjellberg, signed a deal with Disney-owned Maker Studios to create content, he came under fire for using anti-Semitic imagery and language in his videos. The multi-channel YouTube network quickly cut ties with him and YouTube themselves canceled the second season of his series, Scare PewDiePie. And just this fall, he was met with backlash yet again when use a racial slur during a livestream. While the incidents certainly haven’t slowed his content creation or caused his subscriber count to drop, it’s safe to say Hollywood won’t come calling any time soon. 

Another fairy tale-turned-cautionary one is the story of Jake Paul, who shot to fame with his particular brand of prank videos. His digital fame landed him a role on the Disney Channel comedy Bizaardvark, playing a character that was loosely inspired by Paul’s own YouTube history. But when it hit the news earlier this year that his neighbors in the Beverly Grove neighborhood of L.A. were considering a class-action lawsuit against him after he made his home address public, causing massive hordes of fans to clog the street, creating a fire hazard on top of the noise generated from his wild parties and pranks, Disney got uncomfortable. The way he came across in the local news segment didn’t help. (He ambushed the reporter with a t-shirt cannon, climbed on top of the news van, and made fun of the reporters shoes.)

With relations already strained over content in his YouTube videos that the network deemed inappropriate, Disney swiftly released Paul from his contract. “Looking back, I see why everyone was like, ‘Yo, this kid sucks,’” he told The Hollywood Reporter in August. ” ‘Cause I look super immature.” He may have earned two Teen Choice Awards that same month (one for Choice YouTuber), but his chances of bouncing back into traditional media quickly are likely slim.

While it’s clear where the perils of the self-made star lie, it’s also clear that Hollywood will be turning to these personalities more and more as their target demos continue to shun traditional content. But YouTube has grown wise to the game, locking down their biggest stars with development deals for original content on the subscription service, YouTube Red.

Though they’re certainly using Google’s $86 billion in resources to lure high-profile traditional content creators to the website in an attempt to give Hulu and Netflix a run for their money, they can’t risk alienating the digital stars who’ve risen to fame on—and helped make plenty of money for—the site.

So while this generation of YouTube personalities continues to consider Hollywood’s offers, it’s very likely the generation just uploading their first videos now will never have a reason to go elsewhere. And we can’t think of anything more successful than that.

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Common – The Day Women Took Over (feat. BJ The Chicago Kid) (Black America Again Album)

[Verse 1: Common]
There’s something ’bout this day that seem good to me
When niggas I ain’t like is showin’ love to me
Good food and the mood and the hood is free
Peace and free is the frequency
This is the day women took over
No longer over your shoulder do you have to look over
Imagine, war is now over
Mothers get medals for being courageous soldiers
On dollars, it’s Michelle Obama, Oprah and Rosa
The mayor, the shah is Liz Dozier
Hoods feel safer, families feel closer
We all drunk in love with no need to be sober
Ladies get their hair done, and men, we notice
You get high grade Indian weaves, at the lowest
Prices, chivalry is no longer lifeless
We openin’ doors and pullin’ out chairs again
Things are merry and there’s more marryin’
Monthly free doses of Motrin and Valerian
For your menstrual, it’s no more minstral shows
Depictin’ women as ignorant simple hoes
It’s more love songs on the radio
Respect for the ladies, you can hear it in the flow
Egos aside, for each other we rise
Since they done give us a life, the whole world feel alive

[Chorus: BJ The Chicago Kid]
Oh, when women take over the world
Oh, every woman, boy and girl
Oh, maybe one day, we will see
Peace and unity the way it’s meant to be

[Verse 2: Common]
The day women took over, let it continue
Now women get paid as much as men do
Dr. Angelou’s lookin’ from Heaven’s window
Tellin’ young girls phenomenal woman is in you
Body is a temple, men don’t prey
Mother earth’s arms around you sayin’ it’s okay
Toilet seats down, that’s a no-brainer
Monuments in Washington of Fanny Lou Hamer
Harriet, a soldier of truth is marchin’ on
Women preachers and world leaders, it now the norm
Healthcare, payin’ for nails, jails and fill-ins
Intellectual buildin’, intersexual healin’
No stickin’ movers, and no quick shooters
After 15 minutes, callin’ you a Uber
The New World Order is fathers lovin’ their daughters
And baby’s mamas supported and ladies gettin’ courted
In court, kids can’t be tried as adults
And women, they called bitches because they a boss
In all shapes and sizes, beauty is recognized
Goddess and queens is what we use to describe
Now Michelle Alexander wrote the new constitution
Beyoncé made the music for the revolution
Imagine it, a world more compassionate
The balance of the feminine and masculine, I’m askin’ if

[Chorus: BJ The Chicago Kid]
Oh, what if women took over the world
Oh, every woman, boy and girl
Oh, maybe one day, we will see
Peace and unity the way it’s meant to be

Common – The Day Women Took Over lyrics

[Verse 1: Common]
There’s something ’bout this day that seem good to me
When people I ain’t like is showin’ love to me
Good food and the mood and the hood is free
Peace and free is the frequency
This is the day women took over
No longer over your shoulder do you have to look over
Imagine, war is now over
Mothers get medals for being courageous soldiers
On dollars, it’s Michelle Obama, Oprah and Rosa
The mayor, the shah is Liz Dozier
Hoods feel safer, families feel closer
We all drunk in love with no need to be sober
Ladies get their hair done, and men, we notice
You get high grade Indian weaves, at the lowest
Prices, chivalry is no longer lifeless
We openin’ doors and pullin’ out chairs again
Things are merry, there’s more marryin’
Monthly free doses of Motrin and Valerian
For your menstrual, it’s no more minstral shows
Depictin’ women as ignorant simple hoes
It’s more love songs from the radio
Respect for the ladies, you can hear it in the flow
Egos aside, for each other we rise
Since they done give us a life, the whole world feel alive

[Chorus: Bilal]
Oh, when women take over the world
Oh, every woman, boy and girl
Oh, maybe one day, we will see
Peace and unity the way it’s meant to be

[Verse 2: Common]
The day women took over, let it continue
Now women get paid as much as men do
Dr. Angelou’s lookin’ from Heaven’s window
Tellin’ young girls phenomenal woman is in you
Body is a temple, men don’t pray
Mother earth’s arms around you sayin’ it’s okay
Toilet seats down, that’s a no-brainer
Monuments in Washington of Fanny Lou Hamer
Harriet, a soldier of truth is marchin’ on
Women preachers and world leaders, it now the norm
Healthcare, payin’ for nails, jails and fill-ins
Intellectual buildin’, intersexual healin’
No stickin’ movers, and no quick shooters
After 15 minutes, callin’ you a Uber
The New World Order is fathers lovin’ their daughters
And baby’s mamas supported and ladies gettin’ courted
In court, kids can’t be tried as adults
And women, they called B’s because they a boss
In all shapes and sizes, beauty is recognized
Goddess and queens is what we use to describe
Now Michelle Alexander wrote the new constitution
Beyoncé made the music for the revolution
Imagine it, a world more compassionate
The malice of the feminine and masculine, I’m askin’ if

[Chorus: Bilal]
Oh, what if women took over the world
Oh, every woman, boy and girl
Oh, maybe one day, we will see
Peace and unity the way it’s meant to be

Common – The Day Women Took Over

[Verse 1: Common]
There’s something ’bout this day that seem good to me
When people I ain’t like is showin’ love to me
Good food and the mood and the hood is free
Peace and free is the frequency
This is the day women took over
No longer over your shoulder do you have to look over
Imagine, war is now over
Mothers get medals for being courageous soldiers
On dollars, it’s Michelle Obama, Oprah and Rosa
The mayor, the shah is Liz Dozier
Hoods feel safer, families feel closer
We all drunk in love with no need to be sober
Ladies get their hair done, and men, we notice
You get high grade Indian weaves, at the lowest
Prices, chivalry is no longer lifeless
We openin’ doors and pullin’ out chairs again
Things are merry, there’s more marryin’
Monthly free doses of Motrin and Valerian
For your menstrual, it’s no more minstral shows
Depictin’ women as ignorant simple hoes
It’s more love songs from the radio
Respect for the ladies, you can hear it in the flow
Egos aside, for each other we rise
Since they done give us a life, the whole world feel alive

[Chorus: Bilal]
Oh, when women take over the world
Oh, every woman, boy and girl
Oh, maybe one day, we will see
Peace and unity the way it’s meant to be
[Verse 2: Common]
The day women took over, let it continue
Now women get paid as much as men do
Dr. Angelou’s lookin’ from Heaven’s window
Tellin’ young girls phenomenal woman is in you
Body is a temple, men don’t pray
Mother earth’s arms around you sayin’ it’s okay
Toilet seats down, that’s a no-brainer
Monuments in Washington of Fanny Lou Hamer
Harriet, a soldier of truth is marchin’ on
Women preachers and world leaders, it now the norm
Healthcare, payin’ for nails, jails and fill-ins
Intellectual buildin’, intersexual healin’
No stickin’ movers, and no quick shooters
After 15 minutes, callin’ you a Uber
The New World Order is fathers lovin’ their daughters
And baby’s mamas supported and ladies gettin’ courted
In court, kids can’t be tried as adults
And women, they called B’s because they a boss
In all shapes and sizes, beauty is recognized
Goddess and queens is what we use to describe
Now Michelle Alexander wrote the new constitution
Beyoncé made the music for the revolution
Imagine it, a world more compassionate
The malice of the feminine and masculine, I’m askin’ if

[Chorus: Bilal]
Oh, what if women took over the world
Oh, every woman, boy and girl
Oh, maybe one day, we will see
Peace and unity the way it’s meant to be